Every Thing on It is a collection of previously unpublished poems and drawings by the late Shel Silverstein.  Every Thing on It was published in September 2011.  Although Silverstein died in 1999, the magic of his poetry will continue to live on through his writings.  If you are new to the work of Shel Silverstein, or new to poetry in general, this book is a good introduction to those things.  If you are a longtime fan of Shel Silverstein, reading this book is like revisiting an old friend.
Perhaps the greatest thing about the book is that it can be enjoyed by multiple generations, from the smallest children, all the way up through parents and grandparents.  It makes a lovely baby shower gift, can be used in the classroom to introduce children to poetry, makes a good graduation gift, and makes for a pleasant light read.  In a society driven by technology, this book helps to spur children’s imagination in fun, silly, and creative ways.  Although much of the language used is simple, the author never talks down to adolescents or adults.  Many of the poems are short enough to allow a child to memorize them.  In addition, both girls and boys should find this book interesting.  “Burpin’ Ben” and “Rasslin” are two of the poems boys should find appealing; what boy doesn’t like burping or wrestling?
Silverstein’s delightful drawings accompany and wonderfully complement each brain-bending poem.  There is plenty of Silverstein’s characteristic light, humorous verse in such poems as “Every Thing on It,” “New Job,” “The Lovetobutcants,” “The Ball Game,”  “The One Who Invented Trick or Treat,” and “Finally.”
Other poems, however, take a more thoughtful, but not heavy-handed,  tone.  “Growin’ Down,” discusses a man who rediscovers the simple joys of childhood.  “Yesess and Noees” is about the importance of thinking for yourself.  “Food?” addresses the negative information that is often provided about food.  
Some of the poems appear to be more geared toward adults.  “The Clock Man” explores the value of an extra day of life.  “Wall Marks” and “The Dollhouse” both take a nostalgic look at an all-too-fleeting childhood.
In conclusion, my favorite book of 2011 is Every Thing on It, by Shel Silverstein.  Whether you have been a fan of Shel Silverstein for many years, or are new to his work, you will find the sweet silliness of this book delightful!

Every Thing on It is a collection of previously unpublished poems and drawings by the late Shel Silverstein. Every Thing on It was published in September 2011. Although Silverstein died in 1999, the magic of his poetry will continue to live on through his writings. If you are new to the work of Shel Silverstein, or new to poetry in general, this book is a good introduction to those things. If you are a longtime fan of Shel Silverstein, reading this book is like revisiting an old friend.
Perhaps the greatest thing about the book is that it can be enjoyed by multiple generations, from the smallest children, all the way up through parents and grandparents. It makes a lovely baby shower gift, can be used in the classroom to introduce children to poetry, makes a good graduation gift, and makes for a pleasant light read. In a society driven by technology, this book helps to spur children’s imagination in fun, silly, and creative ways. Although much of the language used is simple, the author never talks down to adolescents or adults. Many of the poems are short enough to allow a child to memorize them. In addition, both girls and boys should find this book interesting. “Burpin’ Ben” and “Rasslin” are two of the poems boys should find appealing; what boy doesn’t like burping or wrestling?
Silverstein’s delightful drawings accompany and wonderfully complement each brain-bending poem. There is plenty of Silverstein’s characteristic light, humorous verse in such poems as “Every Thing on It,” “New Job,” “The Lovetobutcants,” “The Ball Game,” “The One Who Invented Trick or Treat,” and “Finally.”
Other poems, however, take a more thoughtful, but not heavy-handed, tone. “Growin’ Down,” discusses a man who rediscovers the simple joys of childhood. “Yesess and Noees” is about the importance of thinking for yourself. “Food?” addresses the negative information that is often provided about food.
Some of the poems appear to be more geared toward adults. “The Clock Man” explores the value of an extra day of life. “Wall Marks” and “The Dollhouse” both take a nostalgic look at an all-too-fleeting childhood.
In conclusion, my favorite book of 2011 is Every Thing on It, by Shel Silverstein. Whether you have been a fan of Shel Silverstein for many years, or are new to his work, you will find the sweet silliness of this book delightful!

Stephen King’s the Wind Through the Keyhole: a Review
I highly recommend the book The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King. Although this novel is a part of the Dark Tower fantasy series, newcomers and Dark Tower fans alike will enjoy it. Set in Mid-World, the book follows the saga of gunslinger Roland Deschain, and his band, or “ka-tet”—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy, the billy-bumbler (a fictitious animal). As Roland’s ka-tet shelters from a severe windstorm called a starkblast, Roland tells the story of his quest to capture the “Skin-Man”, a shape shifter who murders the townspeople of Little Debaria. Roland and his partner Jamie search for the Skin-Man, and question the sole surviving witness, eleven-year-old Bill Streeter, who must identify the culprit. To calm young Bill, and prepare him for the next day’s trials, Roland tells him the story entitled “The Wind Through the Keyhole”. “The Wind Through the Keyhole” is the story of Tim Stoutheart. Tim lives with his mother Nell, and his father, Big Ross, who is an ax-cutter. When Tim’s father is killed, presumably by a dragon, Nell marries Kells, her husband’s co-worker. When the tax collector, known as the Covenant Man, arrives, he sends Tim on a quest to find who really murdered Big Ross. When that story concludes, Roland then relates to his ka-tet how the Skin-Man was captured. The story ends with Roland and his ka-tet resuming their journey.
There are many interesting things about this book. Since it is set in Middle Earth, the language is a bit different from what you may be used to. For instance, old objects are called “arty fax”, and tiger is spelled “tyger”. A novice may have a bit of difficulty identifying the creatures in the book. Fortunately, Stephen King has a glossary on his website, where you can look up the meanings of any words that may be unfamiliar to you.
There is some foul language in the book, as well as a few sexual references, so I would not recommend it to the very young or the easily offended. However, Stephen King is a fabulous storyteller, beautifully intertwining the enchanting and haunting stories.
This was the first Stephen King book I had ever read. I loved it, and will definitely be reading more Stephen King books!

Stephen King’s the Wind Through the Keyhole: a Review
I highly recommend the book The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King. Although this novel is a part of the Dark Tower fantasy series, newcomers and Dark Tower fans alike will enjoy it. Set in Mid-World, the book follows the saga of gunslinger Roland Deschain, and his band, or “ka-tet”—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy, the billy-bumbler (a fictitious animal). As Roland’s ka-tet shelters from a severe windstorm called a starkblast, Roland tells the story of his quest to capture the “Skin-Man”, a shape shifter who murders the townspeople of Little Debaria. Roland and his partner Jamie search for the Skin-Man, and question the sole surviving witness, eleven-year-old Bill Streeter, who must identify the culprit. To calm young Bill, and prepare him for the next day’s trials, Roland tells him the story entitled “The Wind Through the Keyhole”. “The Wind Through the Keyhole” is the story of Tim Stoutheart. Tim lives with his mother Nell, and his father, Big Ross, who is an ax-cutter. When Tim’s father is killed, presumably by a dragon, Nell marries Kells, her husband’s co-worker. When the tax collector, known as the Covenant Man, arrives, he sends Tim on a quest to find who really murdered Big Ross. When that story concludes, Roland then relates to his ka-tet how the Skin-Man was captured. The story ends with Roland and his ka-tet resuming their journey.
There are many interesting things about this book. Since it is set in Middle Earth, the language is a bit different from what you may be used to. For instance, old objects are called “arty fax”, and tiger is spelled “tyger”. A novice may have a bit of difficulty identifying the creatures in the book. Fortunately, Stephen King has a glossary on his website, where you can look up the meanings of any words that may be unfamiliar to you.
There is some foul language in the book, as well as a few sexual references, so I would not recommend it to the very young or the easily offended. However, Stephen King is a fabulous storyteller, beautifully intertwining the enchanting and haunting stories.
This was the first Stephen King book I had ever read. I loved it, and will definitely be reading more Stephen King books!

Achieving Fitness With My Weekly and Monthly Fitness Routines
I find that variety is important in any fitness routine. In addition, fitness is a journey, not a destination. In my pursuit of fitness, I choose weekly and monthly goals. Because I have both a treadmill and a recumbent bicycle, I choose to alternate them. Therefore, I might use the treadmill on Mondays and Fridays. Then, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I may choose to use the recumbent bicycle. I try to set specific goals for these two machines; for example, I may set a goal to walk one-tenth mile more on the treadmill this week, or bike one-tenth mile more next week. The recumbent bike also has eight levels of increasing resistance, so, every month, I may set the resistance one level higher than the month before, or I may increase the amount of time I spend on a particular resistance level. I can adjust both the speed and incline of the treadmill, so I may increase the amount of incline by 0.5 each week. Perhaps one week, I will walk at a 2.0 incline; the next week, I will walk at a 2.5 incline, and the week after that, I will walk at a 3.0 incline. The walking and biking I do are great for my cardiovascular fitness.
On Wednesdays, I go to a yoga class at Strength, Balance, and Yoga in Clarksburg, West Virginia. I have been going there for the past six months. I have attended gentle yoga and basic yoga classes. Yoga has helped me to become more flexible, improved my balance, and decreased my stress levels. I also feel that since starting yoga, my strength and endurance have improved, and I am able to walk or bike for longer periods of time, and with more intensity. On occasion, I also do yoga at home; it seems to decrease my muscle soreness when I do some yoga poses after walking or biking.
I allow Saturdays and Sundays to be open for my choice of activities. One Saturday, I walked in the park with my friend. The walking trail measures a total of 1.5 miles. In addition, Strength, Balance, and Yoga offers a variety of Saturday morning classes. I have attended Power Yoga, and 20-20-20, which is 20 minutes of cardio, 20 minutes of strength training, and a final 20 minutes of yoga. On Sundays, I may do biking, treadmill, or yoga, or any combination of these.
Changing your weekly and monthly routines allows you to continue to grow stronger and more fit, continue to achieve new fitness goals, and not get bored.
The treadmill pictured is the 2014 model.

Achieving Fitness With My Weekly and Monthly Fitness Routines
I find that variety is important in any fitness routine. In addition, fitness is a journey, not a destination. In my pursuit of fitness, I choose weekly and monthly goals. Because I have both a treadmill and a recumbent bicycle, I choose to alternate them. Therefore, I might use the treadmill on Mondays and Fridays. Then, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I may choose to use the recumbent bicycle. I try to set specific goals for these two machines; for example, I may set a goal to walk one-tenth mile more on the treadmill this week, or bike one-tenth mile more next week. The recumbent bike also has eight levels of increasing resistance, so, every month, I may set the resistance one level higher than the month before, or I may increase the amount of time I spend on a particular resistance level. I can adjust both the speed and incline of the treadmill, so I may increase the amount of incline by 0.5 each week. Perhaps one week, I will walk at a 2.0 incline; the next week, I will walk at a 2.5 incline, and the week after that, I will walk at a 3.0 incline. The walking and biking I do are great for my cardiovascular fitness.
On Wednesdays, I go to a yoga class at Strength, Balance, and Yoga in Clarksburg, West Virginia. I have been going there for the past six months. I have attended gentle yoga and basic yoga classes. Yoga has helped me to become more flexible, improved my balance, and decreased my stress levels. I also feel that since starting yoga, my strength and endurance have improved, and I am able to walk or bike for longer periods of time, and with more intensity. On occasion, I also do yoga at home; it seems to decrease my muscle soreness when I do some yoga poses after walking or biking.
I allow Saturdays and Sundays to be open for my choice of activities. One Saturday, I walked in the park with my friend. The walking trail measures a total of 1.5 miles. In addition, Strength, Balance, and Yoga offers a variety of Saturday morning classes. I have attended Power Yoga, and 20-20-20, which is 20 minutes of cardio, 20 minutes of strength training, and a final 20 minutes of yoga. On Sundays, I may do biking, treadmill, or yoga, or any combination of these.
Changing your weekly and monthly routines allows you to continue to grow stronger and more fit, continue to achieve new fitness goals, and not get bored.
The treadmill pictured is the 2014 model.